CRISPR could revolutionize the way we treat thousands of diseases.  Many of these diseases occur when mutations affect genes, or when people have the wrong amount of genetic material,  the Cleveland Clinic reported. Fortunately, CRISPR, or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, has the potential to treat most, if not all of these illnesses. In fact, according to Interesting Engineering, “researchers have already identified DNA errors as the cause of nearly 7,000 diseases. Thankfully, the growing world of genome editing could be the ‘spell-checker’ needed to detect and eventually fix these.” So, I went hunting for CRISPR stocks that will make you rich in ten years.

CRISPR has shown that it could potentially be used to treat cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and neurogenerative issues, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and even muscular dystrophy. It may even help educe the negative impact  of sickle cell anemia, lymphoblastic leukemia, lung cancer, multiple myeloma, Beta thalassemia, and thousands of other illnesses. The bottom line is that CRISPR could usher in a new era of exciting, transformative medicine.

CRSP CRISPR Therapeutics $51.77
GNOM Global X Genomics and Biotech ETF $13.56
EDIT Editas Medicine $8.33

CRISPR Therapeutics (CRSP)

the CRISPR Therapeutics logo seen displayed on a smartphone

Source: rafapress / Shutterstock.com

CRISPR Therapeutics (NASDAQ:CRSP) stock could climb exponentially soon. Exagamglogene autotemcel, a drug owned by both CRSP and Vertex Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:VRTX),  could be approved by the FDA for the treatment of sickle cell disease and transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia (TDT) shortly. A

At the moment, the companies are preparing to submit a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the FDA for Exagamglogene autotemcel at the end of the first quarter. If the treatment is approved, there are rumors that patients will need one dose of the therapy at a cost of $2 million.

About 30,000 people could reportedly benefit from the therapy. If approved, the treatment could generate about $60 billion of revenue for CRSP, whose market capitalization is now $4 billion. And the company’s pipeline is impressive, with nearly two dozen treatments, five of which are undergoing clinical trials.

Global X Genomics and Biotechnology ETF (GNOM)

Illustration of an ETF in multiple sectors.

Source: SWKStock / Shutterstock

Or, if you want to diversify at less cost, consider an ETF, such as the Global X Genomics and Biotechnology ETF (NASDAQ:GNOM). Trading at $13.60 with an expense ratio of 0.50%, the ETF offers exposure to advances in gene editing, genomic sequencing, genetic medicine/therapy, computational genomics, and biotechnology.

The GNOM ETF owns 40 stocks, including Intellia Therapeutics (NASDAQ:NTLA), CRISPR Therapeutics, Myriad Genetics (NASDAQ:MYGN), Sarepta Therapeutics (NASDAQ:SRPT), Gilead Sciences (NASDAQ:GILD), Editas Medicine (NASDAQ:EDIT), and Sangamo Therapeutics(NASDAQ:SGMO) to name a few.

What I like most about the ETF is its low cost per share. Buying 100 shares of the GNOM ETF would cost $1,360. Purchasing 100 shares of each of the ETF’s major holdings, on the other hand, would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Editas Medicine (EDIT)

Concept of DNA being edited using CRISPR-Cas9 technology.

Source: Shutterstock

Like many other stocks, Editas Medicine was crushed over the last 18 months. Since the middle of 2021, EDIT plummeted from a high of about $72.50 to $8.43. Unfortunately, the company just announced that it would no longer research treatments for either inherited retinal diseases or solid tumors. While that’s not the best of news, EDIT will retain its focus focus on treatments for severe sickle cell disease, and transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia. We also have to consider that most of the negative sentiment  has been priced into the stock.

In addition,  the safety and efficacy data on its EDIT-301 treatment for severe sickle cell anemia has been positive. “These promising clinical results… suggest clinical proof of concept for EDIT-301 and support our belief that EDIT-301 can be a clinically differentiated, one-time, durable medicine that can provide life-changing clinical benefits to patients with severe sickle cell disease long term,” said Baisong Mei, MD, Ph.D., Editas’ Senior Vice President, and Chief Medical Officer in a  press release.

On the date of publication, Ian Cooper did not have (either directly or indirectly) any positions in the securities mentioned. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the writer, subject to the InvestorPlace.com Publishing Guidelines.

Ian Cooper, a contributor to InvestorPlace.com, has been analyzing stocks and options for web-based advisories since 1999.